Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Roberto Alagna

Thursday, June 22, 2017


Joe's Concert Reviews

May 4

Metropolitan Opera – Alfano’s Cyrano de Bergerac. May 2, 2017.

JoeMetropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center.  Orchestra (Seat O32, $25). Story.  Cyrano is a poet and a swashbuckler with a huge nose.  He is secretly in love with his cousin Roxane.  Roxane is attracted to the new recruit Christian.  Both express their desire to Cyrano and ask him to be their go-between.  Christian is bad at expressing his love and asks Cyrano for help.  Count de Guiche, another of Roxane’s suitors, sends the soldiers to war. Christian has Cyrano write letters to Roxane – whom he has married – during the deployment.  Roxane visits Christian and tells him she has been moved by the letters, and says she would still marry him even if he were ugly.  Christian is killed in the siege of Arras and his last letter to Roxanne is discovered on his body.  Fifteen years have passed, Roxane now lives in a convent, and Cyrano visits regularly.  One day he arrives wounded by an unknown enemy, and asks to read Christian’s final letter.  Roxane realizes that Cyrano has been the one writing the letters she love.  Cyrano dies in her arms. Conductor – Marco Armiliato.  Christian – Atalla Ayan, Cyrano – Roberto Alagna, Roxane – Jennifer Rowley, de Guiche – Juan Jesus Rodriguez. If the story sounds very familiar, it is because the movie “Roxanne,” starring Steve Martin and Darryl Hannah, is also based on the play by Edmond Rostand.  I don’t remember seeing the entire movie, but vaguely remember it has a good ending – no one dies. Marco Alfano is best known as the composer who completed Puccini’s Turandot when Puccini’s death in 1924 left the opera’s third act unfinished.  Cyrano was composed more than 10 years later, and I certainly wouldn’t be able to make the connection between the two works.  Cyrano was premiered in Italian, today we heard the French version, as Alfano originally intended. The Playbill characterizes the opera as “tragicomedy.”  In my opinion, the first two acts – mostly about unrequited and mistaken love interests, work mostly as comedy, and the second two acts – battle scenes and death – are in the tragedy column.  I recall some light-hearted moments.  The scene where Roxane asks to meet with Cyrano and tells about her love for someone, he initially thinks it is him, only to realize she is talking about someone else; it was done in a comedic manner.  The scene with Roxane in the balcony and Christian expressing his love, with Cyrano providing the prompts initially and eventually taking over, is also funny.  Acts 3 and 4 are basically sad, with the exception of Roxane describing how she charmed her way to the battle front. The sets are quite cleverly designed: moderately complex, realistic, and effective.  They were first used in 2005 when the opera first appeared at the Met.  The various scenes depicted are: town square, bakery, house with balcony, battle scene at Arras, and convent.  There were shorts pauses between Acts so the sets could be switched.  Tonight’s was the tenth performance by the Met, ever. The music does not sound as modern as one would think.  One comparison is with Lulu, which was composed at around the same time.  While there are really no memorable melodies, the lines were smooth, the harmony close to traditional.  I couldn’t tell if it was more French or Italian.  Also, my seat was off to the right side, so a lot of the orchestra music sounded a bit muddled.  The principal singers all did well, and there are a few memorable arias that both showcased their technical prowess and their emotional range.  The chorus was well-prepared for the choral numbers. The New York Times has a background article on the opera, and a mostly positive review of the first performance (same one I saw.)  It turns out Rowley was an understudy for the role, but got this breakthrough chance because Patricia Racette withdrew due to illness. Jennifer Rowley sang the role of Roxane. I took the train in, and it was about 12:30 am that I got home.

parterre box

May 4

Panache room

“In his more than 20 seasons at the Met, tenor Roberto Alagna has sung his way from one end of the Romantic opera repertoire to the other, from Nemorino to Radamès. But last night he found his most congenial and emotionally moving role yet, the part I wager he will be remembered for in decades to come: Cyrano de Bergerac.” [Observer ]






parterre box

April 12

A “Juive’ for the 21st century

At the premiere, in 1835, Fromenthal Halévy’s La Juive triumphed, in part, due to its spectacular staging –critics jested that the military processions could shatter the balance of power in Europe–and in part for the frisson of the opera’s horrific conclusion, Rachel and Eléazar tossed into boiling oil by a Christian mob singing merrily of its “vengeance” on the Jews. Only we, and the wretched Cardinal (who has only just found it out), are aware that Rachel, the titular Jewess, is actually a Gentile, the Cardinal’s long-lost daughter, and that it is her adoptive father, Eléazar, who has taken bitter vengeance on his Christian persecutors. The irony is typical of a grand opera libretto by Eugène Scribe, and was to an extent reproduced with a similarly heavy hand the following year in Meyerbeer’s Les Huguenots. Both these vastly popular operas gave the citizen’s of Louis-Philippe’s Paris the happy reflection that such medieval horrors could never return to the revolutionary modern world, would henceforth sonly appear on the stage as entertainment, not in the streets. That irony, which would have appealed to Scribe if he were still around, makes these once-popular works very relevant indeed in the present day. A brilliant production of La Juive like that of Peter Konwitschny, which premiered (as Zidovka, naturally) at the Slovak National Opera in Bratislava last Friday after earlier essays in Antwerp and Mannheim, generalizes the message that mindless hate does not pay and the mindless mob is always the enemy of civilization. Individuals can change and grow–or refuse to grow. They can be transformed by love. The mob can be swayed or disbanded but never brought to reason The primacy of the mob–which, rather than any individual, even slimy Léopold or bitter Eléazar, is the villain of La Juive–illustrates a major transformation in grand opera of the post-aristocratic era. In the wake of the French Revolution, the chorus had begun to a occupy a new and leading role. It was not a subtle and seldom an ambivalent role; choral forces are usually of a single mind. They were still, at this time, a background against which more individual dramas were played out: the prisoners of tyranny in Fidelio who remind us that what’s at stake is not just one marriage; the oppressed Swiss peasantry of Guillaume Tell; the indignant and restive Gauls of Norma. They inspire or condemn our principals, but before La Juive, they did not hound them to death. With La Juive, this became an option. The chorus has ceased to be background and has become a Character in the drama, just as electoral and national forces had become political actors. Today, Halévy’s music provides the same musical and melodramatic thrills as ever (if you can find the right singers–you don’t need the military processions), but La Juive has a new relevance. Nor, despite Catholic and Jewish ritual elements, need its production necessarily focus on any one conflict. In the Konwitschny’s staging, all the characters wear identical black suits or dresses, aside from Princess Eudoxie, the Other Woman, in blue with a mink coat, and the Cardinal, who adopts a clerical collar. None of the Jews wear kippoth, but all the Christians wear blue gloves and Jews wear yellow ones. Léopold/Samuel, Eudoxie’s noble husband who is also Rachel’s seducer, wears different pairs, at times removing yellow to reveal blue, adopting or renouncing faiths as the plot requires. The howling mob dresses Rachel and Eléazar as Santa Claus and a pope in derision, and for their execution, they are clothed in white as a bride and groom. Konwitschny’s backdrop (by Johannes Leiacker) is an enormous stained glass window that goes dark during the scene at Eléazar’s house. Vertical metal bars become dungeon cells or city streets by turn. Eudoxie breaks into Eléazar’s home (interrupting his seder) drunk, a gun in one hand and a bottle of Moët in the other. She uses the gun to demolish the bottle. Eleazar disarms her, and later turns the gun on the treacherous Léopold, having caught him attempting to elope with Rachel. Rachel takes the weapon next, to threaten herself in order to calm her father down. The gun is an attention-holding symbol of the violence that will destroy them all, and we follow it from hand to hand through the mazes of Act II. In Act III, we have other symbols. Rachel enters Eudoxie’s room in a trench coat. Neither lady is actually wearing gloves at this point–they are merely painted on, though we do not realize this. When Rachel offers friendship, Eudoxie too reaches out–then draws back her hand. She has never actually touched a person with yellow (Jewish) hands. She must force herself to be “tolerant.” The two women duet while scrubbing their hands free of color in the same bucket. But then Léopold is discovered to be Eudoxie’s husband, and the furious Rachel opens her trench coat–to reveal a belt of dynamite around her waist. Like a suicide bomber, she detonates the unbalanced plot. Konwitschny leads the image into the concerted number that ends Act III (and the first half of a one-intermission performance) by turning the stage into a munitions factory where all the singers (with many different colors of glove) take part in an assembly line to produce belts of explosive. The new SND opera house in Bratislava is a handsome, 850-seat theater in a gracious arts complex. There is an open aisle between rows three and four of the orchestra, and the stage area flows on either side of the pit into the parterre. This permits much breaking of the fourth wall. The mob, waving blue (Christian) flags, overflows into the audience, standing among us in a noisy political rally as they humiliate the Jews. Rachel, in torment, joins us in that intervening aisle to scoff at Léopold/Samuel’s explanations. Eléazar comes out on one of the wings of the stage to reflect on the situation of his great aria, “Rachel, quand du Seigneur.” The funeral march before Act V is played against a black curtain with lights glaring down upon us, making us part of the mob of witnesses, an accusation of our society if you like. This was a great night at the opera, shattering political theater, an engrossing commentary on the present situation of our world. With all its charms and its position as a national capital (close to everywhere, an hour’s train ride from Vienna), Bratislava does not rank high on the international opera circuit. The singers are local. The chorus and the orchestra highly schooled and enthusiastic, but lacking the power of a top-rank organization. Programming is gratifyingly original: the new production last month was Vivaldi’s Arsilda. New works as well as arcana show up regularly. The theater can produce to anyone’s capacity. Konwitschny comes often, to tweak evolving shows outside the major league limelight. Aficionados cross the border often. The conductor, Robert Jindra, a Janacek specialist, was in tight control of the massed chorales that pop in and out of the opera, the grand Te Deums, the imperial processions, the spectacular concertato. Everything sizzled. The finest of the singers was Liudmila Slepneva, who sang Rachel with a deep, womanly power and dignity, rising to brilliance in her more hysterical moments. Her despair in the final scenes was most moving. As her opposite number, Eudoxie, Jana Bernáthová acted well–her hesitation to take Rachel’s yellow hand was a striking instant–but sang with a light, watery coloratura providing little body to the high notes and trills. Michal Lehotsky, whose portrayal of the reviled Eléazar was sturdy and passionate, sang the great Seder invocation in Act II and the reflective aria often cut from Act III with a sweeping tone that seemed inspired by the ritual occasion to a shimmering beauty. In contrast, his “Rachel, quand du Seigneur” was gruff, as if the acute self-questioning of his situation was too great for lyricism. Konwitschny retains the bigoted offstage chorus that follows (the singers, however, were not offstage) and Eléazar’s response, the cabaletta of rage in which Eléazar resolves to let his daughter die rather than yield her to his enemies by revealing her identity. This cabaletta, which Neil Shicoff omitted at the Met but Roberto Alagna has been restoring in his performances, was sung with the proper passion, but again Lehotsky let his desperation push him out of more elegant way of singing it. Juhan Tralla sang an athletic but not terribly sensuous Léopold, and omitted the lovely serenade addressed to Rachel. Peter Mikuláš sang Cardinal de Brogni with the proper resonance and spiritual authority, though unable to reach the low E (is it an E?) called for by “Si la rigueur.” His prison confrontations with father and daughter (in which the actual relationships are painfully clear, to us and in the score, though he remains in ignorance) were very intense. Pavol Remenár sang Ruggiero with a gravelly bass but gave a delightfully physical performance–people were always knocking him off platforms or down flights of stairs, and he was always on his feet, emoting, in no time. The opera was sung in the original French with Slovak surtitles; the people around me seemed mostly to be speaking German. Half the audience stood, enthusiastically, when Konwitschny appeared, but there were also some catcalls. I was among the former group. There will be a couple of other performances of the opera, with a slightly different cast, at the end of the month. If you’re nearby (Vienna, Brno, Budapest), go for it. Photos: Pavol Breier

parterre box

March 30

Blood and Gorr

This week rather than the usual full-length work “Trove Thursday” offers instead a short yet potent opera: Massenet’s La Navarraise in a live performance featuring Rita Gorr as Anita and George Shirley as Araquil. The composer’s veristic épisode lyrique in two short acts premiered at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden in 1894, the same year as the first performance of Thaïs and just two years after Werther. London assembled a starry cast which included Emma Calvé and Pol Plançon both of whom were also featured in the Met premiere the following year where it was initially paired with Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice! During that first season, the Met also variously presented the Massenet with two acts of Les Pêcheurs de Perles, the first three acts of Aïda or an entire Trovatore. It then disappeared for twenty-five years until it was revived in 1921 for Geraldine Farrar and was presented on occasion on a double-bill with Leoni’s L’Oracolo starring, of course, Antonio Scotti as Cim-Fen. However, Navarraise eventually fell out of favor until the mid-1970s when surprisingly two studio recordings appeared nearly simultaneously. One featuring Marilyn Horne, Placido Domingo and Sherrill Milnes remains in print , while the more acclaimed CBS version with the unexpected Lucia Popp in the title role alongside Alain Vanzo and Gérard Souzay has never, to my knowledge, been issued on CD. After this 1963 performance, Navarraise only reappeared at Carnegie Hall in 2010 in a concert performance featuring Elina Garanca (as a rather icy Anita) and Roberto Alagna. It was conducted by Alberto Veronesi in one of his fleeting appearances as the head of Opera Orchestra of New York; a rumored commercial recording featuring this trio never materialized. Last summer saw a semi-staged revival of Navarraise as part of the Bard Summerscape Puccini Festival where it was paired with Le Villi. In a piece for The New York Times, Our Own JJ found the Puccini more effective than the Massenet. Those who enjoy Navarraise might want to check out a previous Massenet-Gorr “Trove Thursday” offering —Hérodiade co-starring Régine Crespin, Guy Chauvet and Robert Massard. Although I had scheduled this opera months ago, this week by chance I was reading a collection of tales purportedly written by another Navarraise: the Heptaméron by the renowned Marguerite de Navarre. I had never heard of this fascinating 16th century work, a French equivalent of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Boccaccio’s Decameron, until I saw it cited as the source of a quote prominently featured in André Aciman’s ravishing 2007 novel Call Me by Your Name which I belatedly just read. Massenet: La Navarraise Carnegie Hall January 18, 1963 in-house recording Anita: Rita Gorr Araquil: George Shirley Garrido: Fernando Corena Remigio: Raymond Michalski Conductor: Robert Lawrence As always, this week’s “Trove Thursday” offering can be downloaded via the audio-player included on this page. Just click on the icon of a square with an arrow pointing downward and the resulting mp3 file will appear in your download directory. In addition, this week’s fiery Massenet, last week’s Olympic-themed baroque opera and more than 60 other “Trove Thursday” podcasts are available from iTunes (for free!) or via any RSS reader .

Classical music and opera by Classissima



[+] More news (Roberto Alagna)
May 21
Wordpress Sphere
May 4
Joe's Concert Rev...
May 4
parterre box
May 3
FT.com Music
May 1
My Classical Notes
May 1
ArtsJournal: music
Apr 29
Wordpress Sphere
Apr 12
parterre box
Apr 5
Norman Lebrecht -...
Mar 30
parterre box
Mar 20
Norman Lebrecht -...
Feb 15
An Unamplified Voice
Feb 15
parterre box
Feb 6
Norman Lebrecht -...
Feb 2
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jan 30
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jan 29
Norman Lebrecht -...
Dec 27
Meeting in Music
Dec 1
My Classical Notes
Nov 22
parterre box

Roberto Alagna
English (UK) Spanish French German Italian




Alagna on the web...



Roberto Alagna »

Great opera singers

Angela Gheorghiu La Scala Christmas Sicilian Romeo Et Juliette

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...